Cherries 250g

Cherries 250g

SKU# FINCHERRY250

Availability: In stock

£3.95

Sweet, shiny cherries are one of summer’s real delights. These wonderful specimens are grown for us by Joe Pardoe in his organic orchards in Herefordshire.

The Pardoes have been growing fruit for four generations, so they really know their stuff. These Merchant and Georgia varieties are full-flavoured and oozingly juicy. White shirts be warned!

Quick Overview

Sweet, shiny cherries are one of summer’s real delights. These wonderful specimens are grown for us by Joe Pardoe in his organic orchards in Herefordshire.



The Pardoes have been growing fruit for four generations, so they really know their stuff. These Merchant and Georgia varieties are full-flavoured and oozingly juicy. White shirts be warned!


Cooking

Cherries brighten up a fruit salad, and can be used to top tarts, or as a filling for cakes and pancakes. A favourite pudding in the Field Kitchen is cherry clafoutis.

Storage

Cherries are best kept in the fridge, but bring them to room temperature before eating for flavour.

These come straight from the farm, so they will need a wash. Wait until you’re ready to eat them first, though – otherwise the moisture will encourage the fruit to spoil.

About the grower

The Pardoes have been growing fruit in Herefordshire for four generations. They went organic in the early 1980s, determined to make good organic produce accessible and affordable for everyone. It wasn’t always easy; Joe’s dad, Ian, used to load up his van and offer their fruit cheaply round the housing estates of the North. Unfortunately, he found that people tended be put off if he mentioned that it was organically grown – the fruit shifted much faster if he implied that it was stolen!

Back in the day, their orchards only grew apples. Now they have acres of cherries, pears, and plums too. All their fresh organic fruit is grown and harvested by hand, mostly by Joe and his uncle Bill (with a few extra helping hands during the busiest harvest).

A bit of veg nerdery

Cherries are widely grown in Turkey and are thought to have been introduced to England by order of Henry VIII, who had tasted them in Flanders. Many flowering cherry cultivars, or ornamental cherries, have additional petals rather than stamens and pistils, so they are sterile and do not bear fruit.