Tag Archives: sweetcorn

What’s what in the box – 4th October 2010

In this week’s video, Jane gives you tips on using sweetcorn, savoy cabbage and calabrese broccoli.

what’s what in the box – 4th october 2010

sweetcorn

Here is our recipe for creamed corn with cumin and thyme.

savoy cabbage
Try cooking it in a little bit of oil with bacon and caraway seeds. Cook the seeds and bacon, then when the seeds start to pop, throw in the shredded, washed cabbage and sweat it down for 5 minutes.

calabrese broccoli
Try this recipe for Annie O’Carroll’s roast calabrese with chilli and soy.

veg of the month – sweetcorn

sweetcornYou may have noticed that sweetcorn started early this year. We had hoped to have our first ever crop from our French farm in the Vendée, but sadly the weeds took over and dashed our plans. Sweetcorn is a temperate crop and needs good light levels and warm sun to flourish, so we sourced some early on from Suffolk, where the growing conditions are ideal. The sweetcorn in the boxes now is grown by Jono Smales in the New Forest and Peter Wastenage and John Walter-Symonds, two of our SDOP members in Devon. They judge when the cobs are ripe by feel alone; if you start peeling back the leaves and peeking inside, the cob quickly deteriorates.

Keep sweetcorn in the fridge encased in its outer leaves (the best sort of packaging) and eat it within a day or two for the best flavour. To enjoy it at its simplest, pull off the outer leaves and silky threads, before boiling for 5-10 minutes in unsalted water until tender. Smear with good old fashioned butter. It is also good on the BBQ, if you haven’t yet packed it away for winter. Soak the unpeeled cobs in water for an hour, then cook very gently for 25-45 minutes until the leaves turn brown. The peeled-back leaves make a natural handle for the cooked cobs.

If a particular recipe calls for the kernels only, they are very easy to remove (either raw or cooked). Cut off the end to give some stability, stand it up and slice downwards, cutting the kernels off with a sharp knife. Our cook Kirsty demonstrates this on last week’s ‘what’s what in the box’ video. You could make a smoky salsa with the kernels, to serve with grilled meat or fish. Spread uncooked kernels out on an oven tray and dry roast at 160°C for about 20 minutes, then mix with kidney beans, chopped fresh tomatoes and an oil and vinegar dressing. They are also good for making soup. Cook a chopped onion and a couple of garlic cloves in butter until soft, add the kernels from three corn cobs and cover with a mixture of half water and half milk. Simmer for 10 minutes, then purée, pass through a sieve and season to taste. If you have a favourite recipe for sweetcorn, enter it in our monthly competition to win a fruit box.

What’s what in the box – 20th September 2010

In this week’s video, Kirsty talks about sweetcorn and sweet potatoes. Look out for the baby cows!

what’s what in the box – 20th september 2010

sweetcorn
If you don’t have a big cooking pot, make an incision and the cob should snap in half. Here is a recipe Jane uses for sweetcorn fritters.

If you’re not a vegetarian, we have a recipe for chicken and sweetcorn soup here.

order our sweetcorn online

sweet potatoes

These can be used for a simple supper dish – roast them like a jacket potato. You can also mash them. You can slice them thinly and use in a gratin and you don’t need to peel them. They also work well roasted in wedges with olive oil, paprika, cayenne and a few herbs at 200˚C (gas 6) for 40-45 minutes.

order our sweet potatoes online

Veg of the month – sweetcorn

The current spell of bright, sunny weather means now is the ideal time to enjoy corn at its ripe, sweet best. Our field workers judge when a cob is ready by feel alone; if you peel back the leaves it will quickly desweetcornteriorate. The most damaging (and unlikely-sounding) pest to the crop is our local badger population. Badgers have a sweet tooth and adore wreaking havoc through a field, grabbing mouthfuls of sweetcorn and generally delighting in destruction. An electric fence can keep them at bay, but even then they have been known to outsmart us.

Keep sweetcorn in the fridge encased in its outer leaves (the best sort of packaging) and use within a day or two for the best flavour. It tastes great on the BBQ, if you haven’t yet packed it away for winter; soak the unpeeled cobs in water for an hour, then cook very gently for 25-45 minutes until the leaves turn brown. If you are boiling the cobs, pull off the outer leaves and silky threads, before cooking for 5-10 minutes in unsalted water until tender.

You can stand a cob on its end and slice the kernels off with a sharp knife, although the most satisfying way to eat sweetcorn is undoubtedly to grip it with both hands and gnash off the kernels. For a new slant on the traditional, serve with red pepper and chive butter. Put skinned roasted red peppers, butter, garlic and chilli sauce in a food processor and whizz until combined, then stir in chopped chives, season well and smear on the cobs. Or make a quick soup. Cook a chopped onion and crushed garlic cloves in butter until soft, add the kernels from three corn cobs and cover with a mixture of half water and half milk. Simmer for 10 minutes then purée and pass through a sieve. Cooked sweetcorn is also good in a frittata with kidney beans, grated cheese and red onion. We have chosen sweetcorn fritters as the starter in our ‘box to share’ menu to introduce new people to Riverford; you can find the recipe on the website.