Tag Archives: cabbage

What’s what in the box – 1st November 2010

In this week’s video, Guy talks about kale and cabbage.

what’s what in the box – 1st november 2010

red russian kale

This is a sweet and tender kale. You can cook the whole thing including the stem, especially if you finely chop it at the bottom. Steam briefly and serve.

cavalo nero

This is robust with an earthy, almost bitter iron flavour. Cavalo nero has tough ribs. Grip the rib with one hand and with the other, pull the leaf away. When you get to the centre leaves, they’re tender so you can chop these without stripping them.

If you’re going to boil greens you need to have quite a big pot with plenty of water and a little salt. Plunge them in and get them boiled quickly. When they have been going for a couple of minutes, take them out and refresh under cold water to stop them cooking. Squeeze out as much of the water as you can with your hands. Cavalo nero goes great with a knob of butter, a squeeze of lemon and a bit of pepper.

order cavalo nero online

Questions to the cook – 16th August 2010

Every week we’re answering your questions about cooking, preparing, or storing the fruit, veg, and anything else you get from us. This week Guy answers your questions about courgettes, pointed cabbage and storing your veg. See the original post here.

Post your questions here on the blog and we’ll pass them to our cooks to answer in the next questions to the cook blog.

This week’s questions

courgettes from Riverford OrganicI have quite a few cougettes left and would like some recipes for them. I live alone so recipes that I can portion up and freeze would be good. I am a veggie so no dead animals. Thanks .
Trina Hollis

We are just over the peak of the UK courgette season (typically the last week in July and first two of August is when they are really flushing). As the days get shorter and the nights get cooler the plants run out of vigour they slow down fast. My favourite way of using them is to make a fritter. Grate as many as you have and mix with a little salt to draw out moisture. Leave for five minutes then wrap in a tea towel and wring out as much moisture as possible. Click here for a recipe for courgette and feta fritters with tomato salsa

Jane makes a great salad with tomatoes and courgettes cut into slices lengthways and griddled. See the full recipe here.

One more thing; courgettes are best fresh. After a few days in the fridge they may look OK but they rapidly lose flavour.


Pointed cabbage! Nearly everything else I have found a way of using, actually one of the reasons for trying a veg box was that I felt I was in a veggie rut, but pointed cabbage…sigh. I have tried some things with it, but I still feel a bit uninspired. Something quick, tasty, and different!
Jackie Gibbins

These are a variety called hispi and are incredibly sweet and tender and need very little cooking. Cut in half lengthways and slice thinly. Wash and drain and steam in

pointed cabbage from Riverford Organic

a pan with a tight lid. Serve with a knob of butter plus salt and pepper. If a bit more adventurous slice up some garlic and gently fry in a little butter in the pan for a minute before adding the cabbage as before. Stir through some grated parmesan when cooked…yum. We are serving this in the travelling field kitchen at the moment, sometimes adding finely sliced runner beans with the cabbage..


Is it really best to store vegetables in plastic bags in the fridge? I always thought that paper bags were better as this stopped them sweating.
Joby Blume

I know most of you hate those plastic bags but for leafy veg they are pretty much essential to stop them wilting. They only cause sweating if they get warm (can act as something between a green house and a compost heap) so get them in the fridge and they will be fine. Roots are generally better in paper (especially potatoes to keep them in the dark and onions to keep them dry).

If you have any questions, post them here.

What’s what in the box – 2nd August 2010

Every week we give you tips on using the new season or unusual veg in the boxes. In this week’s video, find out what to do with cabbage, salad pack, courgettes and artichokes. This week the video is in two parts.

what’s what in the box – 2nd august 2010 (part 1)

what’s what in the box – 2nd august 2010 (part 2)

 

onions:
In the spring they were fairly small. This week we have bunched onions in the boxes but in 3 weeks or so we’ll have dried onions.

salad pack
We grow a lot of salad leaves in Devon. We put a mixture of them in the salad pack including pak choi, mustard, rocket and other baby leaves but it depends on what has grown well this week. The idea is to get a good blend and balance of flavours, colours, and textures.

hispi cabbage
These sweet cabbages have been growing well this year. Try chopping up and washing them then blanching in hot water with lemon juice, a knob of butter and pepper. In the Field Kitchen we’ve been quartering them, steaming them and putting them with chorizo sausage, capers and parsley.

courgettes
Courgettes have been in season for around a month now and they generally run until the end of August. Try to eat them fresh. Slice them thinly lengthways, add a little bit of oil and salt and pepper, then chargrill them.

What’s what in the Riverford box – 19th July 2010

This week Guy talks about sugar snap peas, tomatoes, spinach, hispi cabbage, carrots and kohl rabi.

Sugar snap peas
To prepare, break the end and strip it down and it will take the string out. Take the string off each side and then you can steam or boil (for 3-5 minutes). You also can eat them in a stirfry or raw.

Tomatoes
We’ve just come into the tomato season and have had good sunlight so they taste really sweet. Try making your own fresh salsa by chopping them, adding red or fresh onions and a green herb and well as a squeeze of lemon, vinegar and a bit of sugar, salt and pepper. It’s great with tortilla chips or on a courgette fritter.

Bunched carrots
They are tasting fantastic. Don’t bother peeling them. If you want to cook them, theyre great if roast them with kohl rabi. Peel and chop the kohlrabi and roast with the carrots for around 30 minutes.

Spinach
True spinach has fine and succulent leaves. Wash it, leave the water on and cook it in a pan, turn it over, take it out push it into a colander, chop it up finely and then you can use it in all sorts of ways.

Hispi cabbage
Shred these finely, blanch and drain. You could add a squeeze of lemon as well as a little bit of butter and pepper.