Category Archives: What’s what in the box

What’s what in the box – 8th November 2010

In this week’s video, Guy talks about parsnips.

what’s what in the box – 8th november 2010

parsnips

We’ve just started harvesting these this week. You can start lifting them in September but as it gets colder, they get sweeter. They’re at their best around January and are in season until around March. Toward the end of the season they start to get a bit ‘woody’ as they re-grow from the top so the core starts to get a bit tough. If you find them to be a bit tough in February or March, it’s worth quartering them and taking out the core.

Parsnips have a sweet flavour and the simplest and best way to use them is to roast them. They also make a good purée and sweetness goes well with spices.

order parsnips from Riverford Organic

What’s what in the box – 1st November 2010

In this week’s video, Guy talks about kale and cabbage.

what’s what in the box – 1st november 2010

red russian kale

This is a sweet and tender kale. You can cook the whole thing including the stem, especially if you finely chop it at the bottom. Steam briefly and serve.

cavalo nero

This is robust with an earthy, almost bitter iron flavour. Cavalo nero has tough ribs. Grip the rib with one hand and with the other, pull the leaf away. When you get to the centre leaves, they’re tender so you can chop these without stripping them.

If you’re going to boil greens you need to have quite a big pot with plenty of water and a little salt. Plunge them in and get them boiled quickly. When they have been going for a couple of minutes, take them out and refresh under cold water to stop them cooking. Squeeze out as much of the water as you can with your hands. Cavalo nero goes great with a knob of butter, a squeeze of lemon and a bit of pepper.

order cavalo nero online

What’s what in the box – 25th October 2010

In this week’s video, Guy talks about radicchio and gives tips and ideas on using it.

what’s what in the box – 25th october 2010

radicchio
These grow really well in Autumn, after the lettuce season is over. The cannon ball like Chioggia are most commonly sold in the UK but we prefer these tall,  cos shaped radicchio known as Treviso.

It does have a really bitter flavour, so can be used raw in salad, but in a small quantity with a sweet dressing or with fruit or roast squash. If you do find it too bitter to use in a salad, it can be cooked.

Try our recipes for grilled radicchio, radicchio and red wine risotto and radicchio pasta or order radicchio on our website.

what’s what in the box – 18th october 2010

In this week’s video, Guy talks about squash and gives tips and ideas on using it.

what’s what in the box – 18th october 2010

Summer is over and we’re still cutting lettuce and fennel but are starting to get more into the winter produce so lots of leeks, squash and swedes are in the boxes.

squash
Mid October is when we’re busy getting the squash in from the fields. We have to get them in before the first frost comes and this Autumn has been fantastic. We’ve had good sunlight so the squash have ripened well.

storage
Squash hate being cold so never put them in the fridge. Keep them at room temperature and dry, so a shelf in your kitchen is suitable.

sugar pumpkins
These keep for a month or so, are not too strong in flavour so are good for soups and pumpkin pie.

butternut
These keep for 2 or 3 months. To prepare it, peel with a potato peeler and the skin will come off easily. But both ends off, chop it in half lengthways and scoop out the seeds with a spoon.

kabacha
These should keep for around 3 months.

crown prince
These have a tough skin and will keep for 5 or 6 months. They have a strong flavour compared to the others.

To prepare them, knock off the stem and push a sharp knife into the centre. Work it around and split the squash in half. Scoop out the seeds. You can roast it in an oven as it is, brush it with olive oil and roast it again, then scoop out the flesh and use in a soup or risotto when soft.

If the recipe you are using calls for chunks you’ll have to peel it. The skin is too hard for a peeler, so use a knife by placing the squash half face down on a board, working round with a knife, cutting the skin off.

Make sure you never put a whole squash in the oven, it will explode. Cut it in half and de-seed first.

What’s what in the box – 11th October 2010

In this week’s video, Kirsty gives you tips on using fennel, squash, swede and romanesco cauliflower.

what’s what in the box – 11th october 2010

What’s what in the box – 4th October 2010

In this week’s video, Jane gives you tips on using sweetcorn, savoy cabbage and calabrese broccoli.

what’s what in the box – 4th october 2010

sweetcorn

Here is our recipe for creamed corn with cumin and thyme.

savoy cabbage
Try cooking it in a little bit of oil with bacon and caraway seeds. Cook the seeds and bacon, then when the seeds start to pop, throw in the shredded, washed cabbage and sweat it down for 5 minutes.

calabrese broccoli
Try this recipe for Annie O’Carroll’s roast calabrese with chilli and soy.

What’s what in the box – 27th September 2010

In this week’s video, Kirsty talks about romanesco cauliflower and cavalo nero.

what’s what in the box – 27th september 2010

romanesco cauliflower
If you’re new to Riverford you may not have seen one of these before. Store it like cauliflower and broccoli, it will keep longer than calabrese broccoli, but it’s best to keep it in the fridge.

It is crunchier than normal cauliflower but you can use it in the same way. To prepare it, remove the bottom and the outer leaves, break it into florets (or chop if you want) and blanche in water for around 3 minutes. It works well tossed with grilled leeks and beans. Here is a recipe for romanesco cauliflower and pasta.

cavalo nero
This will come in a plastic bag in your vegbox and should be stored in your fridge. To prepare it, de-rib it by pulling the rib out and holding leaves. You can use it in the same way as savoy cabbage. Try these recipes:

ribollita

meatball + black kale broth

For more recipes, visit our website

What’s what in the box – 20th September 2010

In this week’s video, Kirsty talks about sweetcorn and sweet potatoes. Look out for the baby cows!

what’s what in the box – 20th september 2010

sweetcorn
If you don’t have a big cooking pot, make an incision and the cob should snap in half. Here is a recipe Jane uses for sweetcorn fritters.

If you’re not a vegetarian, we have a recipe for chicken and sweetcorn soup here.

order our sweetcorn online

sweet potatoes

These can be used for a simple supper dish – roast them like a jacket potato. You can also mash them. You can slice them thinly and use in a gratin and you don’t need to peel them. They also work well roasted in wedges with olive oil, paprika, cayenne and a few herbs at 200˚C (gas 6) for 40-45 minutes.

order our sweet potatoes online

What’s what in the box – 13th September 2010

In this week’s video, Kirsty talks about celery, beetroot and beans.

what’s what in the box – 13th september 2010

Celery
Sometimes the stalks are tougher on the outside, but you can peel these parts with a peeler. You can eat celery raw, but if you are going to cook it, here is a recipe for celery, tomato and bean salad.

You can also try slicing it up with onions, carrots, leeks, put it all in a casserole dish, then

Another way of cooking it is by chopping up onions, carrots, leeks, put it all in a casserole dish, then cooking for 8-10 minutes before adding the celery and stock, vinegar and herbs. Bake at 160˚C for about 20 minutes.

Beetroot

If you have kids who really hate the beetroot, try our beetroot crisps.

Beans

Try our recipe from one of our Riverford Cooks for roast green beans and red peppers.

What’s what in the box – 6th September 2010

In this week’s video, Kirsty talks about beetroot, leeks and turnips as well as showing how to make a niçoise salad.

what’s what in the box – 6th september 2010


beetroot
thinly slice some garlic and put in a pan with olive oil. Add caraway seeds until they pop then add orange zest and juice. Add peeled beetroot and carrots (and turnips if you have them). Roast it in the oven.
Order beetroot from Riverford

leeks
These are coming through now and don’t need too much cleaning but if you do want to clean them, take a knife, run it down the centre of the leek twice, then hold them down and rinse under a tap to get rid of the mud.
To cook them, try a leek and lemon pasta dish.
Order leeks from Riverford