Category Archives: Recipes

Crafty Halloween idea: Spooktacular Salad!

Crafty Halloween idea: Spooktacular Salad!

Treat hungry trick or treaters to something to tuck into with our creepy skeleton salad bits & dip!

skeleton 2

This spooktacular salad is simple to make and is a great healthy treat for hungry trick-or-treaters.  Kids can get hands-on  arranging the different bones to create their own creepy creature!

Send us a photo of your creepy creations on Twitter or Facebook using #healthyhalloween.  We’d love to see what you come up with!

Ingredients:

  • Pepper
  • Courgette
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots (we used purple carrots for an extra spooky effect!)
  • Hummus
  • Olives
  • Large plate or chopping board
  • Small bowl

Step 1: Cut up the different components ready to arrange on a plate or chopping board.

808-IMG_8090

Step 2: Start arranging your skeleton.  Find a bowl for the head, it’ll be filled with dip later, but it’s great to get an idea of scale for the skeleton’s bones.

Courgettes cut into disks make a great spine, and red peppers are perfect for ribs.

808-IMG_8115

Step 3: Add arms and legs using celery and carrots.  Cauliflower and broccoli are a great way of creating hands and feet.

808-IMG_8123

Step 4:  Fill your bowl with dip and position as the skeleton’s head.

808-IMG_8131

Step 5:  Use cabbage or lettuce leaves for the hair and sliced olives for the skeleton’s eyes.  An off-cut from the pepper is perfect as a smiley mouth.

808-IMG_8140

Step 6:  Chop up any spare veg and put in a side bowl for everyone to get stuck in!

808-IMG_8142

Tuck into your tasty skeleton! Have a great Halloween and don’t forget to send us a photo!

 

 

 

 

Veg heroes

The pick of the our seasonal vegetables to fuel your new year cooking.

Jerusalem artichokes

jerusalem artichokes

These knobbly little roots are a farmer’s dream: easy to grow, with no significant pests or diseases. They do particularly well at Wash Farm – in fact our biggest challenge is keeping them under control. They have a nutty, sweet, almost mushroomy flavour.
order jerusalem artichokes

how to cook jerusalem artichokes
Peel or scrub them, then use in stews and soups. They’re also good roasted in olive oil or sliced thinly and eaten raw in salads. Or try our recipe for jerusalem artichokes and mushrooms in a bag with goat’s cheese.

Celeriac

Another cosmetically-challenged seasonal root (although who looks their best in January anyway?), grown around our Riverford farms. Celeriac endures winter well and has a delicate, celery-like, fragrant flavour. It will keep in the bottom of your fridge for several weeks.
order celeriac

how to cook celeriac
Use celeriac to add depth to stews, mash and gratins or try our recipe for spiced celeriac with lemon.

Kale

Man cannot live on roots alone, so welcome the dark green leafiness of the kales. They benefit from slow growth and are at their best after some hard winter weather. This year our cavolo nero (black kale) is all but over, so look out instead for other varieties, including curly kale, which can be as good as cavolo nero once it has had plenty of frost. Store it in the fridge and eat it within a few days.
order kale

How to cook kale
You will normally need to discard the stalks before cooking – hold the stalk in one hand and run your other hand down it, stripping off the leaves. Curly kale is best boiled briefly or used in hearty, peasantstyle soups and stews. Try our easy ideas for kale.

How to make celeriac remoulade

Remoulade sounds impressive but it’s really simple. Watch Guy Watson make the starter from our Valentine’s menu.

what’s what in the box – 4th february 2011

What’s what in the box – 10th January 2011

In this week’s video, Guy Watson shows you how to cook celeriac soup.

what’s what in the box – 10th january 2011

What’s what in the box – 13th December 2010

In this week’s video, Jane Baxter, head chef at our Field Kitchen restaurant shows you how to make creamed parsnips.

what’s what in the box – 13th december 2010

See the recipe here.

What’s what in the box – 8th November 2010

In this week’s video, Guy talks about parsnips.

what’s what in the box – 8th november 2010

parsnips

We’ve just started harvesting these this week. You can start lifting them in September but as it gets colder, they get sweeter. They’re at their best around January and are in season until around March. Toward the end of the season they start to get a bit ‘woody’ as they re-grow from the top so the core starts to get a bit tough. If you find them to be a bit tough in February or March, it’s worth quartering them and taking out the core.

Parsnips have a sweet flavour and the simplest and best way to use them is to roast them. They also make a good purée and sweetness goes well with spices.

order parsnips from Riverford Organic

What’s what in the box – 25th October 2010

In this week’s video, Guy talks about radicchio and gives tips and ideas on using it.

what’s what in the box – 25th october 2010

radicchio
These grow really well in Autumn, after the lettuce season is over. The cannon ball like Chioggia are most commonly sold in the UK but we prefer these tall,  cos shaped radicchio known as Treviso.

It does have a really bitter flavour, so can be used raw in salad, but in a small quantity with a sweet dressing or with fruit or roast squash. If you do find it too bitter to use in a salad, it can be cooked.

Try our recipes for grilled radicchio, radicchio and red wine risotto and radicchio pasta or order radicchio on our website.

What’s what in the box – 4th October 2010

In this week’s video, Jane gives you tips on using sweetcorn, savoy cabbage and calabrese broccoli.

what’s what in the box – 4th october 2010

sweetcorn

Here is our recipe for creamed corn with cumin and thyme.

savoy cabbage
Try cooking it in a little bit of oil with bacon and caraway seeds. Cook the seeds and bacon, then when the seeds start to pop, throw in the shredded, washed cabbage and sweat it down for 5 minutes.

calabrese broccoli
Try this recipe for Annie O’Carroll’s roast calabrese with chilli and soy.

Questions to the cook – 24th August 2010

We’re answering your questions about cooking, preparing, or storing fruit, veg.  This week we’ve answered your questions on damsons, elderberries, rosehips, cucumbers and our chocolate beetroot brownies.

 Post your questions here on the blog and we’ll pass them to our cooks to answer in the next questions to the cook blog.

help! i’ve been at the hedge veg again! just picked a load of damsons, most of the ones I picked are ok, but hubby picked quite a few greenies, what would you recomend to do with ones that are not quite ripe? risk making jam or make a chutney? and do you have any recipies? also what can i do with elderberries (but make shockingly good wine) and rosehips which i’ve been told are packed with vit c, but again can’t seem to find anything to do with this great “hedge veg” i have all within walking distance of my house. thanks caroline
Caroline Harrison

There’s not a lot you can do with unripe damsons. Leave them on the windowsill for a while so they ripen. You can then try making damson gin with around 450g of washed damsons, 160g of white granulated sugar and 75cl gin. Prick the fruit and pour into a sterilised 1 ltr bottle add the sugar and fill with gin to the rim. Shake every day until the sugar is dissolved and then store in a cool, dark place for 3 months to a year then strain and bottle it.

To use up your elderberries, try a jam. Put 1.3 – 1.8kg of elderberries into a large pan and crush. Heat up and simmer for 10 minutes. Seive the mashed berries and let it strain for several hours.

Measure out 3 cups of juice to make one batch of jam. Any amount more than that you can reserve for making syrup, or add to another batch for jelly. Put 3 cups of juice into a large, wide pot (8-quart). Add 1/4 cup of lemon juice a packet of pectin. Bring it to boil and add 4 ½ cups sugar and ¼ teaspoon of butter. Stir with a wooden spoon and bring to the boil (watching the pot). As it reaches boiling point, stir, and after 2 minutes, remove it from the heat and pour into sterilised jars 

Rosehips also make a good jelly and can be made into a syrup with 4 ½ pints water, 90g rosehips and 45g white granulated sugar. Top and tail the rosehips, boil 3 pints of the water and put the rosehips in a food processor. Transfer the fruit into the boiling water and bring to the boil again before removing from the heat and leaving for 15 mins. Strain the mixture then return the pulp to the pan and add the remaining water. Bring it to the boil, remove from the heat and leave for 15 minutes. Strain again, then add all the extracted liquid to a clean saucepan and boil until reduced to 1.5 pints. Add the sugar and boil for 5 mins then poit into sterilised bottles straight away.


Can I freeze the beetroot chocolate brownies from your Riverford cookbook? and how long can I keep them?
Jan Coppen

Yes, you can freeze them and you can keep them for no more than 3 months.

Try our  recipe for chocolate beetroot brownies here.


got any suggestions for using or preserving cucumbers?
hazelshomegrown (via Twitter)

You can store cucumbers at the bottom of the fridge for a week or so, but the flavour deteriorates – they’re much better if eaten fresh.

As for using them, you can’t really beat cucumber raw in a salad, but for something a little different, try our recipes for spiced cucumber and cucumber pickle.

Order cucumber from Riverford Organic.

What’s what in the box – 23rd August 2010

In this week’s video, Jane Baxter talks French and runner beans, calabrese broccoli, leeks and fennel.

what’s what in the box – 23rd august 2010

calabrese broccoli

For a great pasta and calabrese broccoli dish, cook your pasta in boiling salted water. While that is cooking, cook the calabrese for about 3 minutes in little florets, chop it up small and mix it with anchovies, chilli and garlic. Toss through the pasta once the pasta is cooked.

order calabrese broccoli from Riverford.

leeks

Leeks are back again. A good thing to do with them is cook them for a couple of mins in boiling salted water, cut them in half and then grill them on a griddle plate. Dress them with oil and lemon.

order leeks online from Riverford

fennel

One head of fennel will go a long way. Slice it thinly and use through salads, cut into wedges and roast or try slow cooking it in olive oil until it goes soft and brown- that’s really nice with pork.

buy fennel from Riverford Organic