Category Archives: Recipes

5 vegan recipes for April

April means two exciting things in the veg world: wild garlic and late PSB (purple sprouting broccoli). As winter crops start to tail off and we enter The Hungry Gap, things can start to get a little sparse, but pungent, bright green wild garlic is a bit of a saviour during this period, as are beautiful purple heads of broccoli and spring greens.

Spring greens bring a youthful freshness when winter crops are dull and tired. They’re sweet and tender enough to shine on their own, but given the time and effort are great made into rice rolls like below.

Here are 5 vegan recipes for April, picked by Kirsty, our recipe box cook.

Spring Green Rice Rolls

Around the eastern Mediterranean there are many versions of stuffed leaves, often using vine leaves, but any good-sized cabbage leaf can be used. These rolls have crunch, sweetness and a fresh herb flavour. The simmering finishes off the rice; as it expands more it plumps up the rolls, and the leaves get extra flavour from the lemony oil coating.

Read the full spring or summer green rice rolls recipe.

Wild Garlic & Purple Sprouting Broccoli Ragout

A coconut broth is used to cook nutty tasting wild rice and quinoa, with a seasonal pairing of wild garlic and purple sprouting broccoli: two of our favourite homegrown spring vegetables.

Read the full wild garlic & purple sprouting broccoli ragout recipe.

Spring Green Mung Dal & Chickpea Curry with Shiitake

This version of dal, made with yellow mung lentils, greens and our umami flavoured shiitake mushrooms, is good for a healthy mid-week supper. Earthy shiitake mushrooms really finish off this colourful, creamy, Indian spiced dish.

Read the full spring green mung dal & chickpea curry with shiitake recipe.

Wild Garlic Chickpea Curry

What’s so wild? Garlic leaves, or ‘ransoms’ as they’re known. A seasonal treat, we have special licence to pick ours, treading carefully on the land. It’s tasty in this chana masala style curry – chana translating as chickpeas.

Read the full wild garlic chickpea curry recipe.

Aloo Gobi

A classic cauliflower and potato curry. Serve this with warm naan bread and mango chutney for an inexpensive, quick and flavourful dinner. To make this lighter and greener you could add in a handful of frozen peas and some chopped spinach, chard or kale for the last few minutes of cooking.

Read the full aloo gobi recipe.

5 wild garlic recipes

Every year we forage wild garlic from the woods around our Devon farm. The pungent leaves add a welcome dash of green and liven up all our plates during The Hungry Gap when other crops can be sparse.

Wild garlic leaves have a milder taste compared with dried garlic, and are good stirred into soups, risotto, pasta dishes and eggs; hardcore garlic fans may enjoy wild garlic shredded into salads. Here are a few recipe suggestions.

Wild Garlic Chicken Kiev with Baked Beetroot Bubble & Squeak

Chicken Kiev is a retro classic. Originally made with dried garlic, it works equally as well with the fresh wild garlic we pick each year on the farm. You may get a little butter leak from your chicken; this is normal, just pour it over at the end.

Read the full wild garlic chicken kiev with baked beetroot bubble & squeak recipe.

Wild Garlic & Potato Soup

Paired with the punchy taste of wild garlic, potatoes make a wonderfully savoury and inexpensive soup. Increase the amount of wild garlic, if you dare! We send out the wild garlic leaves but not the flowers, as they’re too delicate to travel, so you’ll have to forage for those if you want to use them – or garnish with lots of chopped parsley instead.

Read the full wild garlic and potato soup recipe.

Wild Garlic Pesto Pasta with Slow Cooked Courgettes

Watch as the courgettes collapse into a thick and unctuous sauce. Low and slow is the key. If you have lots of wild garlic, the pesto recipe can be scaled up and will keep well jarred in the fridge for at least a week if covered with a layer of oil.

Read the full wild garlic pesto pasta with slow cooked courgettes recipe.

Lemon & Thyme Pork with Potato & Wild Garlic Hash

For this recipe, we use spare rib pork steaks as they have a deeper flavour and wonderful marbling of fat to keep them succulent. Paired with chucks of fried potato and wilted wild garlic, this recipe makes a quick, simple dinner.

Read the full lemon & thyme pork with potato & wild garlic hash recipe.

Broccoli, Tomato & Wild Garlic Wheatberries with Mashed Potato

If you’ve not tried wheatberries (wholegrain wheat kernels) before then I hope you like them and want to use them again. They add a really good texture to vegetarian dishes, and can be used in stew style dishes or cooked, cooled and used in salads.

Read the full broccoli, tomato & wild garlic wheatberries with mashed potato recipe.

5 vegan recipes for March

Not only does March (hopefully!) mean a little welcome sunshine and the start of longer days, on the farm it also means the arrival of wild garlic, foraged from the woodland around our Devon farm, and purple sprouting broccoli (PSB), which has been long awaited this year; we usually start picking it in late January but the weather decided otherwise for us this season.

As we approach the Hungry Gap, we’re grateful for the root veg harvested and stored through the winter, and continue to make the most of beautiful vibrant beetroot and our sweet, iconic carrots.

Here are our 5 vegan recipe picks for the month.

Wheatberries & Purple Sprouting Broccoli with Crispy Garlic & Chilli

A hearty and healthy dish combining toothsome wheatberries, PSB and crispy fried onions. Wheatberries are the entire wheat kernel except for the hull. They take a while to cook but have a good nutty texture, lending real substance to a dish.

Read the full wheatberries and purple sprouting broccoli with crispy garlic and chilli recipe.

Red Pepper Paella with Wild Garlic & Almonds

Want to sound authentic and well-travelled? Learn to pronounce paella properly. Essentially the trick is to stifle the ll sound in the back of the throat and replace it with a y sound instead. pie-eh-ya. This recipe makes the most of wild garlic during its short season, and is topped with toasted flaked almonds for an added crunch.

Read the full red pepper paella with wild garlic, almonds & an olive & orange salad recipe.

Indian Masala Roast Carrots with Coconut Red Lentils & Flatbreads

The sweet earthy qualities of the humble carrot make it an ideal vehicle for a whole world of spices. Set against this simple dahl-like bowl of lentils they are best roasted with a little bite left to them.

Read the full indian masala roast carrots with coconut red lentils & flatbreads recipe.

Roasted Beetroot, Carrot, Lentil & Cumin Seed Salad

This colourful, hearty salad has sweet notes from the roasted carrots and beetroot, and a mild, earthy flavour from green lentils. We’ve finished it with a simple zesty dressing made from lemon and olive oil. Try other root veg in place of carrots and beetroot; parsnips or celeriac would work especially well.

Read the full roasted beetroot, carrot, lentil and cumin seed salad recipe.

Jerk Chickpeas & Roasted Peppers with Callaloo

Jerk spice is a Jamaican style spice mix traditionally used to flavour meat, but it also works for vegetarians with pulses and beans. We’ve swapped the blow-your-socks-off Scotch bonnet chillies for some paprika. This makes the flavour more aromatic rather than too hot to handle, as there’s also chillies in the callaloo spinach and coconut sauce. Callaloo is a Caribbean dish which uses an amaranth leaf native to the area, but spinach or chard work well as an alternative.

Read the full jerk chickpeas & roasted peppers with callaloo (spinach & coconut sauce) recipe.

5 vegan recipes for February

Veganuary might be over but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t celebrate plant-based recipes into February, March and for the rest of the year. More and more people are turning to a meat-free or meat reduced diet and veg is finally taking centre stage as it deserves; it’s an exciting time at Riverford where life revolves around all things green! Here are 5 vegan recipe picks for February to help make your veg sing.

Sweet Potato & Lentil Bake


With their rich sweet flesh, sweet potatoes are a vibrant and versatile replacement for potatoes or squash in scores of dishes. They have a light spiciness to their flesh which marries well with the harissa and cumin in the lentils of this dish.

Read the full sweet potato & lentil bake recipe.

Spring Green & Coconut Dal

A colourful, creamy dish which makes the most of our sweet, tender spring greens and finished with a sprinkling of hot chilli and toasted coconut chips. Spinach, cabbage or chard can all be used instead of the greens.

Read the full spring green and coconut dal recipe.

Celeriac, Chickpea & Saffron with Maftoul

This is a Moroccan style dish, lightly spiced with a slight chilli heat. Celeriac has a fragrant, nutty, celery-like taste is great at soaking up surrounding flavours. Celeriacs are notoriously knobbly so we’d advise ditching the peeler in favour of a sharp knife for this one.

Read the full celeriac, chickpea & saffron with maftoul recipe.

Broccoli, Tofu & Udon Bowl with Miso, Parsnip & Peanuts

Miso is a fermented rice or soybean paste and is a fundamental building block of Japanese cuisine. It has a deeply savoury flavour and tastes hugely restorative. You can try and eat this with a fork and a spoon but the best way is with chopsticks, sucking up the noodles over the bowl and slurping the broth.

Read the full Broccoli, tofu & udon bowl with miso, parsnip & peanuts recipe.

Cauli, Beet & Quinoa Bowl

Quinoa has been much heralded in the last few years. It has a very mild bitter edge to its taste but generally makes a great bass note to a whole ensemble of ingredients. We’ve chosen the earthy flavours of beetroot and cauliflower, some pepperiness from the watercress, sweet fruit, crunchy seeds and a sharp tart kick from the orange and balsamic.

Read the full cauli, beet & quinoa bowl recipe.

Live life on the veg this Pancake Day

We thought we’d offer a little inspiration for how to do Shrove Tuesday the Riverford way. Although the classic lemon and sugar combo takes a lot of beating, we think our savoury pancakes are pretty good contenders. They are, of course, all about the veg!

The key to a good pancake is to use an oil suitable for frying at high temperatures, and without a strong flavour, such as sunflower or groundnut oil. Plain flour can be substituted for buckwheat, which goes particularly well with savoury fillings; in France, crêpes are usually made with buckwheat. It’s also gluten-free.

Masala Dosa & Spiced Spuds with Beetroot & Coconut Relish


Masala dosas are the perfect Indian street snack. Traditionally the paper thin dosa pancakes are made with a fermented rice batter. As the process takes 3 days, we’ve cheated a little here and used a mix of rice and chickpea flour. An Indian snack is never complete without a chutney or relish, so a warm beetroot side adds some earthy flavour and bright colour.
Read the full masala dosa & spiced spuds with beetroot & coconut relish recipe

Ragú of Green Beans with Tomatoes, Olives & Farinata


Farinata (also known as socca) is a dense chickpea pancake, often baked in shallow trays in wood-fired ovens. It is perfect to drag through and mop up rich sauces. Enjoy them paired with a herby green bean ragú.
Read the full ragú of green beans with tomatoes, olives & farinata recipe

Sweet Potato Pancakes


These sweet potato pancakes can be adapted for both sweet and savoury tastes. Serve for dinner with a roasted vegetable topping e.g. ratatouille and quick pickled red onions or leftover curry or chilli, or as a hearty breakfast, laced with a pinch of cinnamon and served with sliced banana and maple syrup or honey.
Read the full sweet potato pancakes recipe

Spinach, potato & chickpea pancakes


This recipe ticks the box for both vegan and gluten-free. These chickpea pancakes are stuffed with a curried potato, spinach and chickpea filling. Serve with a good dollop of yogurt, some fruity chutney and wedges of lemon for squeezing.
Read the full spinach, potato & chickpea pancakes recipe

5 quick, midweek Riverford dinners

Stuck in a recipe rut and want to try something new? Live life on the veg with these quick, veg-packed recipes that can be on the table in around 30 minutes. Ideal to mix up your midweek meals!

Broccoli & Sweet Potato Curry with Cashews & Quinoa


This is a light, aromatic vegan curry. The sweet potatoes could easily be replaced with squash or pumpkin if you choose to make it again. Celeriac or parsnip would work well, too. Quinoa is a great source of protein and dietary fibre and stands in well for rice with a curry. It has a different texture, with a light bite and pop to it, but it soaks up all the liquid from the curry well. See recipe.

Chicken, Spinach & Chickpea Tagine with Harissa & Preserved Lemon


Harissa is a spicy blend of chilli, herbs and garlic. We’ve advised using half to start, tasting and adding more towards the end, depending on your preference for heat. We’re using baby spinach here, which can be wilted down in the pan in handfuls. If you make it again with larger leaved spinach, it’s best to blanch, refresh and chop it first. See recipe.

Leek, Mascarpone & Lemon Gnocchi with Walnut & Parsley Pesto


Gnocchi is quick, versatile and up there in the list of top comfort foods. Here gnocchi balls are served in a leek and watercress sauce with creamy mascarpone, then finished with a simple walnut pesto. See recipe.

Teriyaki Tofu Bowl with Shiitake, Crispy Kale & Shredded Sprouts


This is a big mixed bowl of contrasting textures. Sticky dark mushrooms, crisp roasted tofu with a soft melting centre, crunchy seaweed-like kale and a fresh sweet/sharp salad of raw sprouts, all tethered by a comforting base of unctuous rice. With good organisation, all 5 elements should mesh nicely in their preparation. See recipe.

Smoked Mackerel, Celeriac & Watercress Salad


Rich smoked mackerel with clean, crunchy celeriac and apple, peppy watercress and fresh herbs. If you don’t have watercress, use peppery winter salad leaves instead. You could also add in wedges of cooked beetroot, toasted walnuts or slices or waxy salad potato. See recipe.

5 vegan recipes for January

We are firm believers that you don’t need meat to make a magical meal. Whether you want to ramp up the veg in your diet, are giving Veganuary a go, or just want to experiment with new, inspiring and veg-centric meals, these recipes are for you. We hope you’ll enjoy living life on the veg with these colourful, nourishing and bursting-with-flavour dishes.

Thai Celeriac Salad with Noodles & Crispy Tofu


This is dish is inspired by the famous Thai green papaya salad, a dish of crisp shredded veg dressed with a sharp, fragrant and punchy dressing. The noodles and tofu help draw it into a well-rounded meal. As long as they are well drained and retain a slight bite, noodles are a great addition to a salad. This dish is about texture and freshness. The tofu should be crisp on the outside but soft in the centre. See full recipe.

Squash & Tomato Dosa with Green Coconut Relish


The trick to achieving a thin dosa pancake is to tip the pan in a swift, steady roll as soon as the batter hits it. You should be able to guide and swirl the batter into an even layer. The recipe will make more batter than you need so you can have a few experimental runs. We find the first attempt always ends up as a sacrifice to the god of pancakes. See full recipe.

Aromatic Beetroot Curry with Quinoa & Coconut


Healthy and sustaining, this jewel-coloured, mild curry is packed with aromatic spices, cooled with coconut, and served with protein-packed quinoa. If you want to prevent your hands from staining when you’re preparing the beetroot, wear a pair of rubber gloves, although it does wash off, we promise! See full recipe.

Winter Pilaf with Walnut Pesto & Baked Portobellos


A good pilaf is all about light but fragrant spicing and gently methodical cooking of the rice. As best you can, the aim is to try and get the grains of rice fluffy and well separated. Placing a tea towel under the lid helps to absorb condensation in the pan, which in turn helps the grains separate. See full recipe.

Cauliflower Caponata with Garlic & Herb Tortillas


Caponata is a dish traditionally made with aubergines, so using this name may offend any purists, but the other ingredients and general feel of the dish remain correct. It incorporates the Italian principle of agrodolce (literally sour and sweet), a flavour combination that is also prevalent in many other cuisines. The vinegar and briny tang of capers and olives are well balanced out by the sugar and plump sultanas. See full recipe.

Make your own marmalade


A calming January marmalade-making session is a good antidote to the mayhem of Christmas and New Year. Put the radio on, get peeling, slicing and simmering, and fill your house with the distinctive bittersweet aroma.

We buy our Seville oranges from Ave Maria Farm in Mairena del Alcor near Seville, which is run by Amadora and her two daughters. They produce wonderfully gnarly, knobbly, thick-skinned fruit with the incredible aroma and unusually high pectin content that make Seville oranges so valued. There have been orange groves on their 60-hectare farm since 1867 and they were the first orange farm to be awarded organic status in Andalucia. Riverford founder Guy Watson visited them in 2011 and was hugely impressed by the crops and wildlife on the farm, not to mention the energy and orange-devotion of Amadora and her family!

Seville Orange Marmalade Recipe
Our own much-loved recipe. You could substitute in a few of our glorious blood oranges to get a rich, caramel-coloured preserve, or use our incredibly perfumed bergamot lemons to really crank up the aromatics.

Watch Guy make it (and learn from his mistakes!) in this video:

Guy’s tips:
   Make sure the pan is big enough – if it’s too full, it will boil over, and all that sugar will be a nightmare to clean off your cooker
   When you are dissolving the sugar, don’t heat it too vigorously as it will catch on the bottom and you will end up with burnt marmalade – not tasty.
   Don’t boil it too for long; if you go past the setting point you will end up with jars of concrete!
   Skim off any scum before potting up to get a clearer set.
   Let the marmalade stand for 15 mins before jarring – this will stop the fruit from settling at the bottom of the jar.

Makes 6 jars, prep 30 mins, cook 3 hrs

1.5kg Seville oranges
2 lemons
2.5 litres cold water
approx. 2kg granulated sugar
a large pan
muslin
string
sterilised jars
screw top lids or wax discs
cellophane covers
elastic bands

1.   With a sharp knife, peel the skin from the oranges and lemons, leaving as much white pith on the fruit as possible. Chop the peel into 3mm strips and put in a large pan.
2.   Line a large bowl with a piece of muslin, leaving plenty to overhang the sides of the bowl. Cut the oranges and lemons in half. With your hands, squeeze the juice from the fruit over the bowl, dropping the leftover squeezed fruit (pith, pips and flesh) into the muslin.
3.   Lift the muslin out of the bowl, gather the sides and squeeze any remaining juice into the bowl. Tie the muslin together with string to keep the fruit in and form a bag.
4.   Place the muslin bag in the saucepan with the peel. Add the squeezed fruit juice and 2.5 litres cold water to the pan.
5.   Heat until boiling, then reduce the heat and simmer for 2 hours, until the peel is tender. Put a few saucers in the fridge to chill.
6.   Remove the muslin bag and squeeze all the sticky juice from the bag into the pan. An easy way to do this is to put the bag in a colander and use a spoon to press it out.
7.   Measure the contents of the pan in a jug (include the shreds and liquid). Return to the pan and add 450g sugar for every 500ml liquid.
8.   Gently heat for 15 minutes, until the sugar crystals have dissolved. Increase the heat and boil rapidly for 15 minutes.
9.   If you have a sugar thermometer, the setting point for marmalade is 105°C. To check the set without one, put 1 tsp on a cold saucer and push it with the back of a spoon. If it wrinkles, you have reached setting point. If it doesn’t, keep boiling and re-test every 5 mins. Turn off the heat as soon as you reach setting point.
10.   Skim any scum from the surface. Leave the mixture to stand for 15 minutes. Stir gently, then carefully spoon into warmed sterilised jars (use a jam funnel if you have one). If using screw top lids, put the lids on while the marmalade is still hot and turn upside down for 5 minutes to sterilise the lids (or boil the lids for a few minutes and leave to dry before use). If using cellophane, put a wax disc on the marmalade while warm, then seal with cellophane and an elastic band.

Marmalade making is even easier with a Riverford marmalade kit. Seville oranges, lemons, and our recipe included – just add your own sugar and jars.

Tasty turkey leftover recipes from Riverford

We’ve selected our favourite Christmas leftover recipes to help you make the most of any turkey or ham you might still have left on Boxing Day.

bubble & squeak with ham, poached egg & mustard hollandaise262

Bubble & squeak with hollandaise: see recipe here

A great Boxing day brunch dish. Leave out the hollandaise if you like, or if you’re not confident cooking poached eggs, you can fry them instead.

 Turkey risotto: see recipe here

A tasty favourite with a turkey twist. Makes a great recipe for using up the remains of a roast dinner, or substitute leftover goose or turkey after Christmas.

autumn vegetable quesadillas262

Turkey quesadillas: see recipe here

Feel like it’s time for a Mexican twist? Try our turkey quesadilla recipe to add a little spice to the festive season.

Turkey vermicelli soup: see recipe here

This hearty, warming soup uses up the scraps left over from a roast.

5 veggie Christmas recipe ideas

We’ve got five great veggie centrepiece recipes to treat your vegetarian friends or family for Christmas dinner on the big day.

Leek and smoked cheese pithivier

Pithivier is a French pie made with puff pastry.  Traditionally sweet, this one has a smoky cheese and leek filling.  It’s hearty and rich and makes a great showstopper for the big day.

leek & smoked cheese pithivier

Christmas pie with greens, chestnuts and feta

This pie is easily prepared in advance and put into the oven just ahead of dinner.  The feta makes sure the spinach and kale are moorish and creamy, while the chestnuts give it texture.

Squash, chard and stilton pithivier

These individual pies look smart when served and are great for impressing festive guests.  Roasted squash is one of our favourite things and together with chard and soft cheese, it’s hard to go wrong with this dish.

Leek, cheese and herb vegetarian suet pudding

Sweet leeks and soft pastry work together in this dish to create a warming and satisfying centerpiece.  It’s quickly and easily prepared ready to go straight into the oven so you can get on with enjoying the day.

Roasted veg toad in the hole with onion gravy

A classic dish done up for Christmas.  With caramelised onions, softly roasted veg and a crispy and filling batter, this dish is just the thing on a cold Christmas day.

Be sure to send us photos of any of the dishes you make, we love to see what you’ve made!