Hand drawn image of Jerusalem artichoke

Jerusalem artichoke

Helianthus tuberosus

Organic Jerusalem artichokes - knobbly little roots with a sweet, nutty flavour. They’re a doddle for us to grow, and very versatile in your kitchen: Jerusalem artichokes are delicious roasted, make a fantastic creamy soup and are also pretty good simply boiled and buttered.

Image of Jerusalem artichoke being produced

In the kitchen

Storage

In early winter, they’ll keep for several weeks in a cool, damp place. In spring, keep them in the fridge, ideally in a perforated bag, to delay sprouting.

Prep & Cooking tips

They can be very knobbly, though we grow smoother Fuseau variety, and peeling can be a painstaking task. We prefer to soak them in a sinkful of water to loosen the mud, then give them a good scrub; time-saving and you get to eat the nutritious skin too. If you do cut or peel them, store and/or cook them with a dash of lemon juice added: it prevents them from oxidizing and turning grey.

They can be boiled, roasted or cooked and puréed into a velvety soup. You can even slice and eat them raw, although this seems to amplify an already rife tendency they have to induce flatulent side-effects.

Easy ideas

1. Winter soup

They have a wonderfully smooth texture when puréed and make for a rich soup with a little onion, garlic, stock and cream. Maybe finish with some crumbled chestnuts or black pudding. Peel them first; a 5 min blanch in boiling water makes the skins much easier to remove.

2. Roasted

Scrub clean and cut into halves or quarters depending on size. Season well and roast in a high oven for barely 20 mins, until soft and coloured but not collapsing into a mush. A few spices like cumin or caraway marry well, and try finishing with some chopped hazelnuts, runny honey and crumbled sheep’s cheese.

3. Raw

Scrub well and cut into wafer thin slices. Dress with lemon juice, olive oil, sea salt and black pepper. Simple. Consider garnishing with some shaved hard cheese, such as parmesan, a few slivers of cured ham or salami, or a peppery leaf like watercress, rocket or mustard leaf.

Goes well with

Alliums (Garlic, Leek, Onion)
Bacon
Butter
Cream
Celery
Celeriac
Herbs
Lemon
Mushrooms Truffles
Nuts
Parmesan
Shellfish
Tomato

Jerusalem artichoke recipes

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In the field

  • Meet the grower: Neil & Gary Farley, Cullompton, Devon

    Located on sandy land in Devon, the Farleys’ farm is perfect for potato growing – it’s their biggest crop at about 70 acres – followed by the root veg, beetroot and the artichokes.

    Read more

Seasonality

In season through winter and into early spring. Just in time for all those warming wintry stews and soups.
jan
feb
mar
apr
may
jun
jul
aug
sep
oct
nov
dec

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