Hand drawn image of Celeriac

Celeriac

Apium graveolens var. rapaceum

This knobbly, ugly duckling of a root veg is a wonder in the winter kitchen. Under the craggy skin lies a smoky, earthy fragrance that can be the starting point for hundreds of recipes: a classic crunchy rémoulade or salad, a sweet, velvety mash, a warming gratin or a silky soup.

Image of Celeriac being produced

In the kitchen

Storage

Keep cool and damp in an outdoor veg rack or the bottom of your fridge. It should last for several weeks.

Prep & Cooking tips

Give it a good scrub then set to it with a knife to carve away the knobbly skin and roots. A sharp knife is more practical than a peeler as the root end can be a little gnarled and tangled. A little wastage is acceptable for a clean result.

Either chop the celeriac into chunks for roasting, soup or mash, or slice thinly for a gratin. Slice/grate into matchsticks for using raw in salads and rémoulade. Any clean offcuts or skin work wonders in a stock pot.

Video: How to Cook Celeriac

Easy ideas

1. Rémoulade

The signature raw preparation. Peel, coarsely grate or cut into fine matchsticks and mix with good quality mayonnaise or crème fraîche, spiked with a squeeze of lemon and dab of mustard.

2. Braised

Peel and cut into 2cm cubes. Fry on a high heat in a saucepan for a few mins before adding a dash of cider vinegar, a walnut sized lump of butter and half a glass of stock. Cover tightly and braise for 20 mins; stir well and make sure it doesn’t catch or burn.

3. With a spud

Try combining 50/50 with your potatoes in a mash or gratin. For the mash, boil them separately and purée the celeriac before folding it into the mashed spuds. Bake them together in a traditional gratin with garlic and cream and a healthy blob of wholegrain mustard rippled through.

Goes well with

Apple and pear
Caraway
Cheese (Blue, Parmesan)
Cream
Fish and seafood (White fish, Mackerel, Scallops)
Herbs
Horseradish
Lemon
Mustard
Nuts
Pork (Roast pork, Bacon, Ham)

Celeriac recipes

View all Celeriac recipes

Seasonality

jan
feb
mar
apr
may
jun
jul
aug
sep
oct
nov
dec

More in the A-Z

View all A-Z