March

Monday 10th May 2010

We are picking up the pieces after our worst gale of an otherwise mercifully calm winter. It arrived on Sunday night just a few hours after we had finished planting and covering the first lettuces and cabbages. By Monday morning the crop covers were shredded and spread around the neighbouring hedges. Not as bad as the year one took off... continued

Monday 10th May 2010

From September we will have to feed the contents of the school meals we provide for our local school into a computer which will tot up the various quantifiable nutrients and tell our cook if they are fit to eat. I am sure this... continued

Monday 10th May 2010

Last week we discovered that, just a year on from our inception, we have won a place at the grand final of the North East Business Awards in the... continued

Monday 10th May 2010

The English asparagus season begins at the end of April and tends to last only until the first week of June. During this narrow window our asparagus growers, Michael and Charlie, are in the fields daily cutting the spears as they reach the perfect tender age. When asparagus is in season we experience a box buying frenzy, as many of... continued

Monday 10th May 2010

Last year the warm weather in February and March had some strange effects on nature. Usually, late in the winter, creatures are happy to rest and conserve resources in preparation for a surge of energy in early spring. Last year the frolicking that usually begins in April started at the end of February. Adult rabbits in particular seemed to have... continued

Monday 10th May 2010

We grow 104 different types of crops for the boxes. Almost without exception, every crop from the lettuce to the sweetcorn, suffered last year at the hands of the awful summer. But while crops struggled all over the farm, one knobbly little subterranean root was relishing the miserable conditions. By September the Jerusalem artichoke plants (which are related to sunflowers)... continued

Monday 10th May 2010

Despite some rain last week February has been a mercifully dry month. In the drier east of England it is traditional practice to plough the ground during the autumn and early winter. I quickly learned that for an organic farmer in the warm and damp south west, such early ploughing is disastrous. Firstly, ploughing introduces oxygen into the soil, promoting... continued